Bunnings Drive and Collect Hit by Security Breach: How Far Will Hackers Go to Stay Ahead of Technology?

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Bunnings Australia has reported that it was a victim of a customer data breach involving Flexbooker, a firm that supplies online booking and scheduling software. 

Customers who utilised the new Bunnings Drive and Collect service were notified of a data security vulnerability that could have compromised their personal information. 

The alert alerted customers that the security breach may have compromised their name and email address. 

They did, however, ensure customers that the third-party site did not have access to their other personal information, such as passwords, credit card details, or mobile phone numbers. 

‘While no action is required of you in response to this issue, as a precaution, we encourage our customers to be cautious of any unusual activity in their email accounts and to regularly change passwords to enhance online safety,’ they advised shoppers. 

The Reality of Cybersecurity in Retail 

Insider risks are still on the rise in the retail industry.  

The rate of digital innovation is high, and the average retailer has various points of insider vulnerability, such as seasonal and traditional employees, as well as many stores and delivery sites. 

Trends like this are producing a new generation of criminals.  

Instead of stealing money or material assets from a store or warehouse, these cybercriminals are more interested in stealing information, particularly the precious cardholder data that transfers between consumers and businesses. 

Retailers can keep up with hackers, who are continuously changing and looking for new ways to steal important data, by taking a proactive approach to data protection and investing in security education. It is still one of the most successful ways of preventing attacks by empowering employees to better understand, analyse, and mitigate cyber risks. 

Today’s Cybersecurity Challenge 

Traditional definitions of cybersecurity conjure ideas of technology and IT, particularly those centred on data confidentiality, authenticity, and availability.  

However, as the pace of digital transformation accelerates, cyber risks will continue to manifest themselves in business operations, product launches, and other areas of enterprise. As a result, today’s definition of cybersecurity is becoming more diverse and responsive to new and emerging threats. 

These threats can emerge with rapid technological innovation if a holistic view of cyber risk is not included in the innovation process.  

As senior executives and innovators seek to rapidly mobilise new technologies as part of the transformation process, they are challenged to consider how they can do so in a digital world while mitigating risk. 

Ahmed Khanji

Ahmed Khanji

Ahmed Khanji is the CEO of Gridware, a leading cybersecurity consultancy based in Sydney, Australia. An emerging thought leader in cybersecurity, Ahmed is an Adjunct Professor at Western Sydney University and regularly contributes to cybersecurity conversations in Australia. As well as his extensive background as a security advisor to large Australian enterprises, he is a regular keynote speaker and guest lecturer on offensive cybersecurity topics and blockchain.

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